Free Tagalog Video Course

I add content every week, but these free video lessons should be enough to teach you

-How to speak Tagalog

-How to read Tagalog

-How to understand Tagalog

-How to write in Tagalog

PRIVATE LESSONS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE!

Flash Cards

Free quizlet flash cards It is an easy way to learn new Tagalog words! I just added flash cards through quizlet. You can access them for free using the link below! More sets will be added shortly!

 

Tagalog Pronounciation Part I

This is a short video on how to pronounce Tagalog vowels and also some Tagalog consonants.

Tagalog Pronounciation Part II

This is a short video that explains combination letters and sounds as well as a brief tutorial on how to roll or trill an "R".

"NG" Learn to pronounce the infamous "NG" sound in Tagalog

In this Video I explain how to pronounce the "NG" sound. Which is the only consonant that is in Tagalog, but isn't present in the english language.

Tagalog Greetings

How to greet someone in Tagalog. This is a short video on the greetings that correspond to the time of day.

Learn Tagalog Greetings

Greetings:

Magandang Umaga - Good Morning

Magandang Tanghali - Good Noontime

Magandang Hapon - Good Afternoon

Magandang Gabi - Good Evening

Magandang Araw - Good Day

 

Responses:

Magandang umaga rin sa iyo- Good morning to you too

Magandang tanghali rin sa iyo- Good noontime to you too

Magandang hapon din sa iyo - Good afternoon to you too

Magandang gabi rin sa iyo- Good evening to you too

Magandang araw din sa iyo- Good day to you too

Kamusta- Learn to say how are you in Tagalog

Learn how to use the ever popular phrase "kamusta" in Tagalog. Even if you already know this word I garuntee I will show you somethings you didn't know.

Set I Pronouns

Learn Tagalog pronouns. This video teaches you the "Set I"  pronouns. These are the first grouping of pronouns I recommend that you learn first.

Tagalog Set I Pronouns

Ako - I/me

Ikaw/Ka - You

Kami - We (exclusive)

Tayo - We (inclusive)

Kayo - You all

Siya - He/She

Sila - They

 

Ma- Adjectives I

Learn Tagalog adjectives. This video explains how to use adjectives in Tagalog, and is 1 of a 2 part series.

Ma- Adjectives II

Learn Tagalog adjectives. This video is part 2 of a 2 part series. This video finishes explaining how to use adjectives in Tagalog.

Tagalog Adjectives

How To Use Tagalog Adjectives:

Most, but not all adjectives in Tagalog start with "ma". We are now going to go over the multiple ways you can use adjectives.

 

Describing Pronouns:

Adj. + Set I Pronoun 

 

Example:

Matalino ako = I am smart

 

Describing Things:

The adjective must link to the noun. The way to link an adjective to a noun depends on if the adjective ends in a vowel or consonant.

 

If an adjective ends in a vowel you simply add an "ng" on the end of the adjective

 

Example:

Matalino means smart and lalaki means man so to say smart man we need to link matalino to lalaki with an "ng" like so:

 

Matalinong lalaki - smart man

 

If the adjective ended in a consonant like "mabait", which ends in the letter "t". You link the adjective to the noun by using "na".

 

So "mabait" means nice and "lalaki" means man so in order to say nice man you will need to link "mabait" to "lalaki" like so:

 

Mabait na lalaki - nice man

 

Making Declaritive Statements:

In order to say something like "the man is smart" or "the man is nice" as opposed to saying "smart man" or "nice man" you would use the word "ang".

 

The word order is as follows:

Adj is noun or "nice is he" so the way to say the man is nice is:

 

Mabait ang lalaki - The man is nice.

 

and to say "the man is smart" would be:

 

Matalino ang lalaki - The man is smart.

 

 

 

 

 

COMMIN ADJECTIVES (EXAMPLES)

free quizlet flashcards

                                       

Mabagal - slow                                    Maliit - small

Matanda - old (people)                    Malaki - big/large

Bata - young                                         Mayaman - rich

Mabilis - fast                                          Madali - easy

Mapanis - thin                                       Mainit - hot     

Mataba - fat                                            Malimig - cold

Payat - skinny                                        Matamis - sweet

Masarap - delicious                             Maalat - salty

Mabait - nice                                           Masama - bad

Magalit/galit - angry                            Mahaba - long

Mabago/ bago - new                            Maiksi - short

Luma - old (things)                               Mabasa - wet

Marami - many/numerous                Makapal - thick

Mahirap- difficult/poor                      Malambot - soft

Madalas - often/frequent                  Malinis - clean

Masustansiya - nutritious                 Marumi - dirty

Maganda - beautiful/ good              

Maanghang - spicy

 

For a more comprehensive list of adjectives check out my Dictionary page.

 

"AY" "AY" Captain

In this video I teach you how to use the "ay" sentence stucture format which is more commonly used in songs and poems.

Making "AY" Sentences

AY:

Using "AY" is just another sentence structure that you can use. Many English speakers like this structure, because it follows the English sentence structure.

 

Note:

"AY" is very rarely used. It is usually only seen in poems, songs, and government forms. Do not use this in your speech often, because it sounds a little strange to native speakers.

 

Sentence Structure:

Ang noun ay adjective

 

In order to say "the man is smart", knowing that "matalino" means smart and "lalaki" means man would look like this:

 

Ang lalaki ay matalino - The man is smart

 

It is very easy and follows the English sentence structure order.

 

Colors in Tagalog

This video is a short tutorial on the colors of Tagalog as well as how to use them.

Colors

Free quizlet Flash Cards

 

Kulay - color                                        Itim - black

Berde - green                                      Puti - white

Asul - blue                                            Pula - red

Dilaw - yellow                                     Ube - purple

Mais - yellow                                       Abo - gray

Orange - orange                                 Kahel - orange

Tagalog (Filipino) Numbers

How to count and use numbers in Tagalog (Filipino).

Tagalog Numbers

Bilang - number     Numero - number

isa - one.              Uno - one

dalawa - two      Dos - two

tatlo - three        Tres - three

apat - four           Kwatro - four

lima - five            Singko - five

anim - six.           sies - six

pito - seven        siete - seven

walo - eight        Otso - eight

siyam - nine       Nuebe - nine

sampu - ten        Diyes - ten

labing - teens

dalawampu - twenty

tatlongpu - thirty

apatnapu - forty

limangpu - fifty

animnapu - sixty

pitongpu - seventy

walompu - eighty

siyamnapu - ninety

once - 11              Dose - 12

trese - 13              Katorse - 14

kinse - 15            

Diyes y sies - 16

diyes y siete - 17

diyes y otso - 18

diyes y nuebe - 19

bente - 20

trienta - 30

kwarenta - 40

singkwenta - 50

sesenta - 60

setenta - 70

otsenta - 80

nobenta - 90

Daan/siyentos - hundred

libo/ mil - thousand

This, That, It, and That over There (Demonstrative Pronouns)

This video is how to use Demonstrative Pronouns or "this, that, it, etc".

Demonstrative Pronouns

These function the same way as Set I Pronouns

 

Ito - this/it

Iyan - that (which is close to you but far from me)

Iyon - that (which is far from both of us)

Mag Verbs

This video explains how to use Mag verbs, the most common type of verb in Tagalog.

Learn Tagalog Mag Verbs

Mag Verbs:

"Mag" verbs are one of the most common verb forms there is in the Tagalog language. It is very consistant and easy to conjugate.  Unfortunantly the only way to know if a verb is a "mag" verb is memorization and experience. I have a dictionary with a comprehensive list of common "mag" verbs which you can look at by clicking here.

 

Example:

Let's use the example "Magbigay"

 

The word "bigay" means give and is the root word, but alone doesnt really mean anything.

 

Infinitive:

By placing "Mag" in front of it we create the infinitive form so 

Magbigay means to give. 

The infinitive form of a verb is usually accompanied with "to" in English. For example "to run" or "to give".

 

Past:

In order to make a "mag"  verb past tense you simply change  the "m" in mag to an "n" forming "nag"

So the past tense of "magbigay" or "gave" would be:

Nagbigay which means gave

 

Present:

The present tense of "mag" verbs is formed by replacing "mag" with "nag" and doubling the first syllable of the root word.

So in the word bigay we have two syllables bi/gay

So we double the first syllable being "bi"

So the present tense of Magbigay or "giving" would be:

Nagbibigay

 

Future:

The Future tense of a "mag" verb is formed by doubling the first syllable of the root word in the infinitive form so it would look like this:

The future tense of Magbigay or "will give" would be

Magbibigay

 

Note:

Since Tagalog likes to put vowels together and vowels are pronounced seperatly if a vowel starts a root word you simply double that vowel.

 

Example: Magalala 

The root word is "alala"

The first syllable would be "a"

So the future tense would be Magaalala

and the present would be Nagaalala

 

Summary:

A mag verb with the root "bigay" would be conjugated as follows:

Magbibigay - will give (future tense)

Nagbibigay - am giving (present tense)

Nagbigay - gave (past tense)

Magbigay - to give (infinitive)

 

"UM" Verbs

Learn Tagalog verbs. This video explains how to use "UM" verbs in Tagalog.

Learn Tagalog "UM" Verbs

UM Verbs:

"UM" verbs are one of the most common verb forms there is in the Tagalog language. It is very consistant and easy to conjugate.  Unfortunantly the only way to know if a verb is a "um" verb is memorization and experience. I have a dictionary with a comprehensive list of common "um" verbs which you can look at by clicking here.

 

Example:

Let's use the example "Pumunta"

 

The word "punta" means to go and is the root word, but alone doesnt really mean anything.

 

Infinitive:

By inserting "UM" in between the first and second letter we create the infinitive form so 

Pumunta means to go. 

The infinitive form of a verb is usually accompanied with "to" in English. For example "to run" or "to give".

 

Past:

By inserting "UM" in between the first and second letter we create the past form so 

Pumunta means went.

You probably noticed that the infinitive Pumunta and past Pumunta are the same. This is no typo, they are in fact conjugated the same way.

 

Present:

The present tense of "UM" verbs is formed by inserting "um" in between the first and second letter of the root word, and add the first vowel after the "um".

This may sound confusing, but I will break it down for you.

So the second letter in the root word "punta" is "u"

So following my rule we must insert "um" after the "p" in pumunta followed by a "u" which would look like this.

So the present tense of Pumunta or "going" would be:

Pumupunta

 

Future:

The Future tense of a "UM" verb is formed by doubling the first syllable of the root word so it would look like this:

The future tense of pumunta or "will go" would be

Pupunta

 

Example:  Bumili

The root word is "bili"

The first syllable would be "bi"

So the future tense would be bibili

and the present would be bumibili

and the past and infinitive would be bumili

 

Summary:

A "UM" verb with the root "punta" would be conjugated as follows:

Pupunta - will go (future tense)

Pumupunta - am going (present tense)

Pumunta - went (past tense)

Pumunta - to go (infinitive)